Events

Policing Chicago’s Black Neighborhoods

This presentation will be based on Dr. Simon Balto’s research that explores the development of a police system in Chicago’s Black neighborhoods that over the course of the mid-twentieth century became simultaneously brutally repressive and neglectful.

This program is supported by Humanities Iowa and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The views and opinions expressed by this program do not necessarily reflect those of Humanities Iowa or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

About the Speaker

Dr. Simon Balto teaches, researches, and writes about African American history in the United States. His first book, Occupied Territory: Policing Black Chicago from Red Summer to Black Power (University of North Carolina Press, 2019), explores the development of a police system in Chicago’s Black neighborhoods that over the course of the mid-twentieth century became simultaneously brutally repressive and neglectful. His writing has also appeared in TIME magazine, The Washington PostThe Progressive, the Journal of African American HistoryLabor, and numerous other popular and scholarly outlets. Professor Balto earned his Ph.D. in History from the University of Wisconsin in 2015, where he also earned a Master’s Degree in African American Studies. He has been the recipient of grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Mellon Foundation, among others.

 

About the Series:

Humanities Iowa has generously funded another series of presentations from visiting historians, professors, and lecturers. This year’s series will be tied to our current exhibit, Driven By Hope, which focuses on African American migration following the Civil War. The presentations are between February and July. Topics will focus on responses to migration – music, fashion, food, social responses, legal responses, and even some discussion on current migration and immigration issues. Be sure to join us for these free, engaging, and thought-provoking presentations!

Economics of the Great Migration

Please note that the location for this presentation is subject to change. Check back soon for full details.

This program is supported by Humanities Iowa and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The views and opinions expressed by this program do not necessarily reflect those of Humanities Iowa or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

About the Speaker:

Dr. Marianne H. Wanamaker received her PhD. from Northwestern University in 2009 and now teaches at University of Tennessee as an associate professor of Economics. During the 2017-2018 academic year, she was on leave at the President’s Council of Economic Advisers covering labor policy and serving as the chief domestic economist. She is a Kinney Family Faculty Fellow, a Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) Fellow, and the BB&T Scholar in Markets, Capitalism and Ethics in the Haslam College of Business. She has written several papers on American economic history and the relationship between race and economics.

 

 

About the Series: 

Humanities Iowa has generously funded another series of presentations from visiting historians, professors, and lecturers. This year’s series will be tied to our current exhibit, Driven By Hope, which focuses on African American migration following the Civil War. The presentations are between February and July. Topics will focus on responses to migration – music, fashion, food, social responses, legal responses, and even some discussion on current migration and immigration issues. Be sure to join us for these free, engaging, and thought-provoking presentations!

Modern Immigration

Professor Stella Burch Elias of the University of Iowa Law School will present on modern immigration, refugees, and asylees with a focus on African immigrant populations that have settled in Iowa.

This program is supported by Humanities Iowa and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The views and opinions expressed by this program do not necessarily reflect those of Humanities Iowa or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

About the Speaker:

Stella Burch Elias teaches civil procedure, foundations of international law, immigration law, and comparative law at the University of Iowa and directs Iowa’s London Law Program. Her research involves public international and comparative law, with a focus on United States and foreign immigration and nationality laws. Prior to joining the law school faculty, she held  a two-year appointment as a Climenko Fellow and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School. Professor Elias earned her BA and MA from Oxford University and her JD from Yale Law School. Prior to law school, Professor Elias served as a diplomat in the United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth Office.  Following law school, she clerked for Judge Stephen Reinhardt of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  She is an active member of the Iowa Bar.

About the Series: 

Humanities Iowa has generously funded another series of presentations from visiting historians, professors, and lecturers. This year’s series will be tied to our current exhibit, Driven By Hope, which focuses on African American migration following the Civil War. The presentations are between February and July. Topics will focus on responses to migration – music, fashion, food, social responses, legal responses, and even some discussion on current migration and immigration issues. Be sure to join us for these free, engaging, and thought-provoking presentations!

African American Struggle for Citizenship and Education in Iowa

Please note that the location for this presentation is subject to change. Check back soon for full details.

This program is supported by Humanities Iowa and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The views and opinions expressed by this program do not necessarily reflect those of Humanities Iowa or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

About the Speaker:

Dr. David Brodnax, Sr. received his bachelor’s degree in history at Illinois Wesleyan University. He earned a law degree at the University of Iowa before receiving a master’s in history at Northwestern University. In the spring of 2007, Brodnax successfully defended his doctoral dissertation at Northwestern. He joined the faculty at Trinity Christian College in 2005. His teaching areas of interest include African American history, America & Western civilization, black cinema, history of sport, and the Civil Rights Movement. He is a member of the Association for the Study of African-American Life and History, the Law and Society Association, and the Organization of American Historians.

 

 

About the Series: 

Humanities Iowa has generously funded another series of presentations from visiting historians, professors, and lecturers. This year’s series will be tied to our current exhibit, Driven By Hope, which focuses on African American migration following the Civil War. The presentations are between February and July. Topics will focus on responses to migration – music, fashion, food, social responses, legal responses, and even some discussion on current migration and immigration issues. Be sure to join us for these free, engaging, and thought-provoking presentations!

Black Migration and the Fight for Community Space in Iowa

In 1839 the first territorial government of Iowa past a series of laws that denied black residents citizenship rights like the right to vote, testify in court, act as jurors, or participate in the state militia. In addition to these restrictions, the legislature passed “An Act to Regulate Blacks and Mulattoes.” The act was intended to restrict and prevent the migration of black people to the state. Black Iowans fought back against these laws and created vibrant communities by building community networks, working with white allies to petition state lawmakers, appealing to the courts in their fight for freedom, and utilizing black military service.

This program is supported by Humanities Iowa and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The views and opinions expressed by this program do not necessarily reflect those of Humanities Iowa or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

About the Speaker

Dwain Coleman is a PhD candidate at the University of Iowa. In 2016 he earned his Masters degree in history from Iowa State University with the thesis ““Still in the Fight: The Struggle for Community in the Upper Midwest for African American Civil War Veterans,” which won the Iowa History Center Award for Outstanding Master’s Thesis in Iowa History, He has previously presented at the Preserve Iowa Summit, Mormon History Association Conference, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, and Muscatine Community College. His teaching interests include African American History, Nineteenth Century U.S. History, Civil Rights Movement, American Religious History, and Native American History.

About the Series:

Humanities Iowa has generously funded another series of presentations from visiting historians, professors, and lecturers. This year’s series will be tied to our current exhibit, Driven By Hope, which focuses on African American migration following the Civil War. The presentations are between February and July. Topics will focus on responses to migration – music, fashion, food, social responses, legal responses, and even some discussion on current migration and immigration issues. Be sure to join us for these free, engaging, and thought-provoking presentations!